The History of the US Flag in Black America

1776 flag

1776-1777

Articles of Confederation establishes rights for “free citizens.”

1777-1794

1777-1794

The first Fugitive Slave Act is passed

1795-1818

1795-1818

Slaveowner, Francis Scott Key writes The Star-Spangled Banner. He believed blacks to be “a distinct and inferior race” and “the greatest evil that afflicts a community.” The third verse celebrates the death of slaves.

1818-1819

1818-1819

Slaves complete reconstruction of White House

1819-1820

1819-1820

The House of Representatives agrees to the Talmadge Agreement barring slaves from Missouri, this led to the Missouri Compromise admitting them.

 

1820-1822

1820-1822

The Missouri Compromise allowed Missouri to enter the Union as a Slave state.

1822-1836

1822-1836

At Monticello, VA. 130 former slaves and other possessions of Thomas Jefferson were sold at auction.

1837-1845

1836-1845

In Cincinnati, OH, rioters attack blacks and white abolitionists for fear blacks would take their jobs.

1845-1846

1845-1846

Texas enters the Union as a slave state

1846-1847

1846-1847

Missouri allows Interstate trading of black people

1847-1848

1847-1848

The State of Missouri prohibits freed slaves from receiving an education.

1848-1951

1848-1851

Congress passes another Fugitive Slave Act mandating government participation in recapturing escaped slaves.

1851-1858

1851-1858

Under this flag, the Supreme Court overturned the Missouri Compromise and opened up slavery to all the territories.

1858-1859

1858-1859

The Supreme Court in the Dred Scott Case ruled a black man had no rights.

1859-1861

1859-1861

The last slave ship arrives in Mobile Bay, Alabama

1861-1863

1861-1863

New York City draft riots, hundreds of blacks wounded or killed.

1863-1865

1863-1865

Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest orders the massacre of mostly Negro Union troops attempting to surrender, (Hands Up). A 25-foot statue, visible from Interstate-65, exists today on private property in Nashville, TN.

1865-1867

1865-1867

The “black codes” are passed in all Southern legislatures in the former Confederate States. Slavery by another name.

1867-1877

1867-1877

Reconstruction ends when the Federal Government withdraws all Federal troops from the South under a compromise over the Presidential election. It Made Southern Legislatures White Again.

1877-1890

1877-1890

Jim Crow becomes the law of the land in the South

 

1890-1891

1890-1891

Eighty-five black Americans were known to have been lynched in 1890

1891-1896

1891-1896

The Supreme Court legalizes “Separate but Equal” giving rise to Jim Crow

1896-1908

1896-1908

Eight blacks were killed by whites in Wilmington, NC

1908-1912

1908-1912

Major cities implement legalized segregation specifying black and white neighborhoods. These include Baltimore, Dallas, Greensboro, Louisville, Richmond, Roanoke, and St. Louis.

 

1921 US Flag

1912-1959

Oklahoma National Guard troops bombed Black Wall Street in Tulsa, OK

1959-1960

1959-1960

Three days before his trial, Mack Charles Parker is beaten to death in his jail cell for allegedly raping a white woman.

1960-Present

1960-Present

Donald Trump is elected President and appoints Jeff Sessions as Attorney General.